Blog posts

Imperial Consultants – here to help you make an impact

During the 20+ years that Imperial Consultants (ICON) has been facilitating commercial consultancy projects for Imperial’s researchers, we have seen staff expertise make a real difference to the world in many ways. Contributing to the development of revolutionary new drugs and maximising patient care standards through innovative staff training techniques are just the tip of the iceberg.
With the rise of the impact agenda as a way to monitor the value of research, demonstrating research impact is now an essential element of any successful research career. The scope for FoM researchers to do this by acting as consultants to external organisations is expanding as the global quest for improvement and innovation in medicine and healthcare rolls on. The boundaries between academia and the outside world are becoming increasingly blurred and the need for academic, research-generated knowledge to address the latest challenges in the medical field is on the rise.
Undertaking consultancy often allows you to demonstrate the benefit that your expertise conveys to industry and society in a relatively short space of time, and it can provide real-world examples to give context to your teaching. Add the fact that it can spark new ideas for research and brings in a bit of extra income and you’d be right in thinking that it is a constructive route to explore….or resurrect if you’ve not undertaken a project in a while.

Introducing the FoM team at ICON

ICON is here to help you throughout the process. Our dedicated business development staff – Andreas Ballis and Louise Chisholm – can advise you on the consultancy market and pricing in your area of expertise. They specialise in building relationships with external organisations to develop consultancy opportunities for you. Our Head of Contracts – Azra Awan – can assist you in negotiating Terms and Conditions with the client to minimise your risk in undertaking the work. Finally, our project administration staff – Alfred Li, Elena Martynenko and Monica Villafana Cerna – are here to handle invoicing and payment and ensure that your project runs smoothly, allowing you to concentrate on the task in hand. For more information on our service, please download our Quick Guide to ICON’s Service (PDF file 295 KB).

People facilitating consultancy in medicine
Facilitating consultancy in medicine, from left to right: Monica Villafana Cerna, Elena Martynenko, Louise Chisholm, Andreas Ballis, Azra Awan, Alfred Li

If you would like to find out more about consultancy or have an opportunity that you would like to discuss, please visit the ICON website or contact Andreas Ballis (a.ballis@imperial.ac.uk) or Louise Chisholm (l.chisholm@imperial.ac.uk)

Jane Cryer
Marketing and Communications Officer
Imperial Consultants (ICON)

SCI selected to receive donations from MaxMind

SCI has been selected to receive donations this year from MaxMind, an industry-leading provider of IP intelligence and online fraud detection tools, based in Waltham, Massachusetts. SCI was selected on the strength of the Givewell recommendation (www.givewell.org ).

The donations will be used to expand SCI’s coverage of treatments for school aged children against schistosomiasis and intestinal worms in rural areas of Africa. By supporting these treatments, MaxMind will be bringing improved health and education to millions of vulnerable children.

alanfenwick-profilepic

Professor Alan Fenwick OBE
Professor of Tropical Parasitology
School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine

 

 

Partnership for Child Development November 2014 Update

PCD Receives Grant for Global Health & Development

PCD  has been recently awarded by Grand Challenges Explorations an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation for a project focused on improving market information among stakeholders of Kenya’s school feeding programme. The programme is a government-led intervention which procures food used in school meals locally from smallholder farmers and has been described as a ‘win-win’ for both children and farmers alike; with well-fed children more likely to attend and stay in school and farmers more secured of a livelihood. Specifically, the project will develop a software platform using everyday items such as mobile phones, to improve the tendering process between the programme’s stakeholders, namely, the schools (buyers), traders (buyers and sellers) and farmer groups (sellers).

Click here to read more

School-Based Deworming: A Clear Role for the European Commission

School-based-deworming-image-of-policy-paper-edit Periodic drug treatment for children in schools – known as school-based deworming – represents a highly strategic approach to tackling soil-transmitted helminths (STH) and schistosomiasis. Integrated programmes that deliver deworming, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), health education and other key interventions lead to even greater long-term impact.

A new paper called ‘School-Based Deworming’ (PDF download 2.8mb), from Imperial College London’s Partnership for Child Development argues that the European Commission (EC) is on the margins of the growing global movement against NTDs and with its financial resources, technical capacity and global network, the EC can and should be at the forefront of efforts to tackle the diseases, in particular schistosomiasis and STH. In order to rise to this task, the EC requires a clear policy direction, and must ensure that the control and elimination of schistosomiasis and STH are integrated into its education, nutrition and WASH strategies and programmes.

Click here to read more

Charlotte Broyd
Communications Officer
Partnership for Child Development
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology

Disability Awareness Month and equality, diversity and disability information resources

The Faculty of Medicine has drawn together the College’s range of information resources on equality, diversity and disability issues into one easy-to-access webpage at http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/staff/

As part of Disability Awareness Month  which is taking place throughout November and December, the Equality & Diversity team has organised a number of events. Full information is available from the webpage at http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/equality/events

Trudy Breuss
Campus Operations Officer
Faculty of Medicine

NHLI Bring Your Child to Work Day

Following on from last year’s hugely popular pilot event, this year saw the return of the NHLI Bring Your Child to Work Day which is part of the department’s Athena SWAN initiative. Nearly 70 children along with their parents across all five NHLI campuses attended the fun-filled day of science-related activities and a Halloween tea party on the 30th of October. Like last year, tens of volunteers across the department got together to deliver an event that not only included exciting activities for the kids but also gave parents a chance to network with other parents in the department.

141030_imp_nhli_parents_034-editChildren at the Hammersmith campus were put straight to work, doing quizzes and data analysis, whereas at the Brompton campus kids became CSI investigators trying to find out who had kidnapped Monty the Macrophage. The CSI themed activities included comparing fingerprint evidence, separating ink from different pens on chromatography paper, and extracting DNA from a kiwifruit. Other highlights included dissecting a sheep’s heart in the Reach Out Lab, the excellent face painter at the Halloween party (a big hit among the kids!), and Provost James Stirling’s visit.

NHLI would like to thank all attendees and volunteers, and we are already much looking forward to next year’s event!

141030_imp_nhli_parents_009[1]-edit

Dr Aino-Maija Maskuniitty
Career Development Coordinator
National Heart & Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine

What do rectal examinations, liver surgery and cardiovascular interventions have in common?

Apart from being medical and surgical procedures, they are nowadays important topics of interest in biomedical modelling and simulation research. Earlier this year I had a paper accepted at the 6th International Symposium on Biomedical Simulation (ISBMS) and a month ago, in October, I went to Strasbourg to present it. I was looking forward to hearing some Alsatian being spoken, although given my basic French skills I didn’t actually notice a difference. ISBMS was organised by the SiMMS group at Imperial College London and by the SHACRA team at INRIA. The event was hosted at IRCAD (Research Institute against Digestive Cancer) in a high-tech room that resemble those at the UN where important topics are also discussed. I found the symposium a great opportunity to discuss new approaches and challenges in the area among experts in the field.

Researchers presented results about physics-based modelling of both soft tissue (organs, vasculature, skin, muscles) and bone structures related to training systems and haptics (enabling the sense of touch in virtual systems), vascular modelling, deformation during image acquisition, surgical planning, and analysis, characterisation and validation studies. I presented a haptics and deformation modelling approach to simulating Digital Rectal Examinations (DRE) using patient-specific models captured via MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging). The results from this paper will allow junior doctors to gain the necessary skills to perform DRE more efficiently compared to existing teaching methods.

ISBMS Presentation

Keynote speakers included Prof Mathias Brieu (Biomechanical Lab, Ecole Centrale Lille) who signalled the importance of modelling patient-specific data and the need for parameters that allow modelling differences in patients. Francisco Chinesta (Ecole Centrale Nantes) and Elias Cueto (I3A, Zaragoza) presented a computational vademecum (where all solutions are pre-computed) to model organ deformation by the parameterisation and further decomposition of relevant variables that are present during simulation.

I was captivated by the tranquillity of the city and it was interesting to learn how Strasbourg, now home to the European Parliament and Council of Europe, has been inhabited for 600,000 years. The city was occupied by the Romans (Argentoratum, 12BC) and was controlled later on by Alemanni, Huns and Franks (Strazburg, 5th century). The revolution of 1332 heralded 300 years of Strasbourg as a republic, before it was annexed by Louis XIV of France (1681), by the German Empire (1871) and finally by France (1919) following the Treaty of Versailles. Strasbourg Cathedral, III river and the area called Petite-France were beautiful, and this beauty extends to the city’s cuisine…Choucroute, Tarte FlambéeAlsacienne and La Terrine de Canard were exquisite.

Roger Kneebone’s recent feature in The Guardian ‘The Doctor Stitching Together Medicine and Art‘.

 

Alejandro Granados

Research Assistant

Department of Surgery and Cancer

“From bench to bedside – is personalised medicine the future?” CSC Chain-Florey Fellows invited leading experts to have their say

The MRC Clinical Sciences Centre’s Chain-Florey Fellows met at the annual workshop last Thursday (13 November) to present the researchthey have been working on at the CSC, and take part in the lively discussions that followed.

The CSC’s Chain-Florey Clinical Research Fellowships offer medical graduates the opportunity to complete PhDs in basic science at the CSC. Clinically trained Fellows develop a unique appreciation of the practical application of treatments and bring a valuable perspective to science research. Since the scheme’s inception in 2009, 17 Fellowships have been awarded and graduates have emerged ready to tackle clinical research questions with scientific precision. The scheme is jointly funded by the MRC and NIHR through the Imperial BRC.

Every year, the most senior fellows showcase their research in front of an audience of medical experts. This year, Dr Allifia Abbas Newsholme, Dr Philip Webster and Dr Andrew Innes gave fascinating talks that reflected the high quality of training in basic science that they received on the three-year fellowship.

Allifia Abbas Newsholme, who is now close to completing the fellowship with Amanda Fisher’s Lymphocyte Development Group, kicked off the Chain-Florey presentations with a talk on ‘Non-invasive imaging of imprinted gene expression’. She is working to devise a system to image changes in the expression of the CDKNIC gene. Mutations in this gene cause Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, which is characterised by an increased risk of tumour formation. Originally from Dubai, Allifia embarked on the fellowship with an undergraduate degree from the University of Leeds, an intercalated BSc in immunology at the Royal Free in London, and two years of training in her specialty of Nephrology at the London Deanery.

Philip Webster, who has completed his PhD with Anthony Uren’s Cancer Genomics Group, presented his research on the genetics and kinetics of BCL2 driven lymphoid malignancies. BCL2 is a gene involved in preventing programmed cell death, known as apoptosis. If the gene is overexpressed it prevents apoptosis. Cells remain alive for too long, leading to cancers and autoimmune diseases. By identifying genes that are commonly mutated with BCL2, Phil altered their expression in lymphoma cells to investigate the role they play in the development of lymphoma – a cancer of white blood cells. Phil trained at Nottingham University Medical School and has worked across the UK and Australia. In 2007, he came to London and later began his specialist training as nephrologist. Having returned to his specialty training in renal medicine, he intends to pursue an academic career path. He is currently renal registrar at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust.

“The Chain-Florey Fellowship is an excellent opportunity to acquire solid, basic science training for any doctor intending to have a career in academia. I wanted to gain knowledge, experience and learn new techniques within the genomics of the immune system and then apply this to my interest in autoimmune diseases,” he says.

Andrew Innes’s talk was titled, ‘Investigating senescence regulation: a telomere damage model.’ Andrew, who has almost completed the fellowship with Jesús Gil’s Cell Proliferation Group, looked into the genes that control senescence in the natural ageing process. “Senescence is well known for its role in controlling cancers, but its role in fibrotic disorders is less well understood,” he says. “I’m interested in post-transplant fibrotic disease, specifically Graft Versus Host Disease (DVHD). There’s a lot of evidence that this mimics autoimmune disease, but there is also evidence that could link it to senescence.” Andrew approached the bench with a firmer grounding in basic research than many other Chain-Florey Fellows because he had finished a nine-month Academic Clinical Fellowship at Imperial College with Francesco Dazzi. After training in Dundee, Glasgow and Manchester, Andrew moved to London in 2008 to specialize in Haematology.

Their talks were followed by a riveting panel discussion on the future of personalized medicine. The panelists grappling with this divisive topic were:

 

Dr Peter Campbell – Head of Cancer Genetics and Genomics at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and joint head of the Cancer Genome Project.

Professor Irene Roberts – Head of the Developmental and Stem Cell Biology Group at the Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine.

Dr Anne-Marie Coriat – Director of Capacity Skills and Infrastructure at the MRC.

Dr Sohaila Rastan – President and Chief Executive Officer at Ceros Limited and Chief Scientific Advisor of the RNID.

Professor Jonathan Weber – Director of Research at Imperial NIHR Biomedical Research Centre.

Dr Jeremy Griggs – Biology Leader and Biologist in the Discovery Partnerships with Academia team at GlaxoSmithKline.

 

The afternoon ended with a keynote speech from Dr Peter Campbell. He discussed ‘the vast somatic mutational landscape of cancers’, with particular reference to the molecular pathology of Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML).

To read more about the CSC Chain-Florey scheme, its sponsors and advocates, current and previous Fellows, please visit the CSC website.

 

Almut Caspary
Institute of Clinical Science
Faculty of Medicine

South Kensington Campus – Centralised booking system for meeting rooms

There is now an online booking system available for Faulty of Medicine meeting rooms in the Sir Alexander Building and Flowers buildings, South Kensington Campus.   The new system has the advantages to gather in a single place meeting rooms with information on location, equipment and capacity.  Importantly,  booking is now done faster and easier by providing room availability updated daily.

Please check in the link:

http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/staff/meetingrooms/

I would like to thank Faculty of Medicine for support and give special thanks to people that made possible this project: Michele Foot, who coordinated the team, and the help from Taylor Bennie, Jeremy Jones, James Moore, Al McCartney, Andrew Pritchard, Peter Moore and Kylie Glasgow.

We hope you find the new system useful and we would appreciate any comments and suggestions to improve it.

Dr Vania Braga
Reader in Cell-cell Adhesion Signalling
National Heart & Lung Institute
Faculty of Medicine

Daniel Cappon Prize 2014

Applications are invited for the Daniel Cappon Prize. This is a biennial award of £500 open to students or recent graduates from the Faculty of Medicine at Imperial College (in last 2-yrs), as well as postgraduates on the St Mary’s & Charing
Cross Psychiatric Training Schemes, in recognition of a published article in a medical journal or reputable non-medical publication, on a topic relating to the widest aspect of psychosocial problems.

Candidates should email a copy of their selected article, whichshould have been published, or be in press, by 30th November 2014, to Nicole Hickey (n.hickey@imperial.ac.uk) using theSubject title ‘Daniel Cappon Prize’) by 19th December 2014, together with a covering letter describing the background to the work, their part in it, and why the article merits consideration for the Prize.

The winner will be announced in January 2015 & invited to present at a Research meeting.
 
Nicole Hickey MSc MBPsS
Admin Secretary
Centre for Mental Health

Best paper award won at the #design4learning conference

Dr Maria Toro-Troconis, Mr Ashish Hemani and Dr Kevin Murphy won best paper award at the #design4learning conference run by the Open University (OU) and the Higher Education Academy (HEA) on the 26 & 27 November 2014 . HIG01S0002_Logo_Primary_Blue_RGB_MV1ou-logo

Following a competitive selection the paper entitled ‘Learning Design in the 21st century. Blended Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©) and MOOCit©’ won the best paper award.

 

The paper discussed The Blended Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©) developed by Dr Toro-Troconis at the School of Medicine and the implementation and findings in the design of a blended learning course for the Respiratory Muscles tutorial in Year 1 of the MBBS course.

 

The Blended Learning Design Tool (BLEnDT©) introduces an instructional framework for the design of blended learning approaches identifying the learning outcomes that lend themselves to interactive self-guided online learning following an Instructionist approach and the learning outcomes that are best suited for face to face delivery or online delivery following a Constructivist/Collaborative approach.

 

BLEnDT© is currently used at the School of Medicine at Imperial College London and by the Imperial College Curriculum Development team – Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine.

 

The School of Health Sciences at City University London, the Centre for Technology Enhanced Learning at King’s College London and the University College London (UCL) are also collaborating in the use of BLEnDT©.

 

More information about BLEnDT©: http://www1.imperial.ac.uk/medicine/elearning/blendt/
#design4learning conference: http://design4learning.org.uk

#BLEnDTImperial
twitter-logo
 
 

Dr Maria Toro-Troconis
E-Learning Strategy and Development Manager
Faculty of Medicine

Educational leadership appointments

I am delighted to announce the following appointments to two educational leadership roles in the School of Medicine:

Professor Margaret Callan has been appointed as Course Leader (Rheumatology) for Year 5 of the Undergraduate Medicine programme, following the departure of Dr Sonya Abraham.  Professor Callan is Deputy Head of Year 5, Course Leader for Immunology in the Year 5 Pathology Theme and a Consultant Rheumatologist at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital.

Dr Elizabeth Muir has accepted an appointment to lead a programme of work supporting the School’s ‘Year of Feedback’.  The purpose of this project is to identify and deliver improvements to the feedback provided to our students throughout the undergraduate Medicine programmes.  Dr Muir is a Clinical Senior Lecturer in the Department of Primary Care and Public Health and a General Practitioner.  She is also Theme Leader for Foundations of Clinical Practice and co-leads the Problem Based Learning teaching.

I hope you will join me in congratulating them on their new appointments.

Chris Harris
Quality and Educational Development Manager
Imperial College School of Medicine

CIPM celebrates staff awards

Centre for Infection Prevention and Management (CIPM ) collaborators Dr. Eimear Brannigan and Enrique Castro-Sanchez have had cause to celebrate recently.

Earlier this year Dr. Brannigan was nominated for the Imperial College Teaching Excellence Award for 2013-14. The award was set up in 2003 to recognise excellent teaching among NHS staff. We are delighted to announce that the nomination was successful and Dr. Brannigan will be presented with her award at a ceremony on Tuesday 25th November at 5.30pm in the Glenister lecture theatre at Charing Cross.

Our senior research nurse Enrique Castro-Sanchez has been awarded a travel scholarship by the Florence Nightingale Foundation Trust. The scholarship is to enable Enrique to undertake a study in South Africa, Mozambique and Rwanda on building nursing capacity in antimicrobial stewardship: learning from low and middle income countries. The study builds on CIPM’s existing partnership with hospitals in Rwanda, including the work to reduce neonatal mortality and maternal and paediatric infection through improved patient safety in Rwanda, funded by THET Partnerships for Global Health.

Ellen Clegg
Education Project Manager
Centre for Infection Prevention and Management
Faculty of Medicine

2013 alumnus wins the British Orthopaedic Association’s Robert Jones Gold Medal

The MEd Surgical Education Community would like to congratulate 2013 alumnus Mr Andrew Wainwright for winning the Robert Jones Gold Medal from the British Orthopaedic Association, after submitting an essay based on his MEd studies.  Andrew, a consultant surgeon and Training Programme Director in Oxford, completed his MEd in Surgical Education with a Distinction and a dissertation entitled “A good pair of hands”. In the prize-winning essay he discussed the themes of competence, apprenticeship and craftsmanship in orthopaedic surgery today. By exploring the essence of what ‘having a good pair of hands’ means to surgeons, he proposed how this could improve the way that orthopaedic surgeons learn, teach, and assess surgical skills.

Susan Clark
Honorary Senior Lecturer, Adjunct Professor
Department of Surgery & Cancer
Faculty of Medicine

Poppy Lamberton shortlisted for The Women of the Future Awards

poppylamberton-profilepicPoppy Lamberton was recently shortlisted for The Women of the Future Awards – the largest national search for exceptionally talented women, which unearths the next generation of high-flying women across nine industries, including technology, media, business, arts and science. Poppy, a Junior Research Fellow in the Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, was shortlisted for the 2014 Science category. Poppy works on neglected tropical diseases, which are often endemic in the world’s poorest rural and urban communities. Her research currently focuses on parasitic infections such as Bilharzia and River Blindness, with the aim to maximize the success of treating populations in Africa. Poppy’s research utilizes field epidemiological data, laboratory experiments and population genetics to understand parasite population structure, transmission dynamics and the effects of long term mass drug administration programmes. Poppy is also passionate about public engagement with science, talking at a range of schools and working closely with STEM and the Natural History Museum on events such as Science Uncovered and Nature Live.

Dr Poppy Lamberton
Junior Research Fellow
School of Public Health
Faculty of Medicine

Anatomy in Year 1 and 2 MBBS/BSc

living anatomy1It has been a busy summer for the Anatomy Department as the 13th floor Anatomy skills lab has been re-fashioned to allow its partition into clinical cubicles to simulate a clinical environment. We are grateful to everyone who contributed to make this happen such a short space of time. Amazingly we managed to finish the job by the start of term. The length of both DR and Living Anatomy practicals have also been increased this year to allow more time for assimilation of material. We look forward to the students feedback on these improvements.
We are also making an iPad version of the course handbooks available with colour illustrations to download, for those students who have their own iPads.The changes to the skills lab will also benefit the GE 1 students.

living anatomy2living anatomy3living anatomy4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professor Mary Morrell
Sleep & Respiratory Physiology
Faculty of Medicine

New Seminar Rooms at St Mary’s

3Z1A7274aThanks to a recent project (jointly funded by College and from funds generated through the (LKCMedicine) joint initiative in Singapore) the St Mary’s campus can now offer two brand new seminar rooms which are available for booking.

The project consisted of converting an existing office area within the ground floor St Mary’s medical school into 1 large seminar room, with full College AV provision, and seating for 88, and 1 smaller seminar room with seating for 42, and again full college AV spec.

As an additional enhancement, the smaller seminar room can be sub divided to give a small meeting room/Video conferencing facility, and a 26 person seminar room (has movable wall to divide room).

Both rooms can be combined, to house 130 people, and you can stream same content between the rooms, controlled by larger room AV lectern.

The new rooms can be booked in the usual manner, and are called the “Norfolk Place Teaching Suite“, rooms G64 (large), G65A (small meeting and/or Polycom Video Conferencing) and G65B (26 person seminar room). Both G65A+B need to be booked when space for up to 42 people is required.

3Z1A7288a3Z1A7282a3Z1A7320a

 

 

 

 

3Z1A7308a3Z1A7295a3Z1A7293a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stephen Pullen
Faculty of Medicine Client Co-ordination Manager
FoM Capital Projects

Pankaj Sharma appointed Professor of Neurology at the University of London

drWe are pleased to announce that Mr Pankaj Sharma has been appointed Professor of Neurology at the University of London and Head of a new cardiovascular research institute at the Royal Holloway College. He will continue a clinical appointment at Imperial College NHS Trust.

Pankaj Sharma is Consultant Neurologist at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust (formerly Hammersmith Hospitals). He has doctorates from Cambridge and London Universities and was a Fulbright Scholar at Harvard Medical School USA.

He leads the internationally renown Imperial College Cerebrovascular Research Unit (ICCRU) and has published widely in major international journals.

Professor Sharma’s clinical interests include: headache, stroke, dizziness, seizures, fits and epilepsy.

Please visit this page for details of Mr Sharma’s experience and publications.

 

Pankaj Sharma MD PhD FRCP
Head, Imperial College Cerebrovascular Research Unit (ICCRU)
Imperial College London & Hammersmith Hospitals

WHOCC members participated in a leadership and health management training in Nairobi

On the 13th of September, members of the WHO Collaborating Centre left to Nairobi, Kenya to conduct a one-week course on Leadership and Health Management. The training, held in partnership with UNICEF Somalia Country Office, targeted high-level health officials of the Somali Ministry of Health, as well as WHO and UNICEF country officials.

The WHOCC leadership training aims to provide current national, regional and local leaders and decision makers the necessary management and leadership skills to cope with every day as well as crisis situations. By becoming better leaders, health officials will be able to contribute to the improvement of the Somali health system and to provide more effective services to the population.

Throughout the course and by means of very hands-on exercises, participants developed leadership skills such as delegation, team work, or evidence-based decision making. Each day was dedicated to a specific area of health management: from leadership skills to quality of care, management in health, policy and strategy, and governance. After receiving their certificates, participants returned to Somalia, with the skills and tools to inspire and influence those around them.

nairobi_blog_post_cropped

IGHI Autumn Update

Student Challenges Competition 2014 – a chance for students to win up to £5k in funding towards their global health research project.  Applications deadline: Midnight 28th November 2014.

student challenges

Maternal care in Somaliland – IGHI welcomed special guest speaker, Edna Adan Ismail, who presented a seminar on the issues affecting maternal and child health in Somaliland, Africa.

Edna Ismail

IGHI’s Helix Centre publish new End-of-Life Care guidance apps – the HELIX Centre has released Apps on the iTunes and Google Play app stores to provide End of Life Care Guidance to health workers on the front line.

Helix app for news splash

The World Innovation Summit for Health (WISH) Invites Innovators To Showcase Their Projects at the 2015 Summit – WISH has announced its first ‘Innovation Showcases’ competition.

innov showcase 2

WISH joins forces with Health Affairs to launch September issue – ten articles inspired by the World Innovation Summit for Health featured in September issue of Health Affairs

Health Affairs

Social networking can help people lose weight – social networking programmes designed to help people lose weight could play a role in the global fight against obesity, according to research.  This was one of the ten articles featured in the September issue of Health Affairs.

The Commonwealth Fund’s U.K Harkness Fellowship Scheme – The Centre for Health Policy to coordinate applications on behalf of Imperial & Imperial College NHS Trust, nominating 1 candidate per organisation.

 

Jo Seed
Communications and Events Officer
Institute of Global Health Innovation

IUA Award from the XXVI World Congress in Sydney

The Josef Pflug Vascular Laboratory of Imperial College has recently won the prize for the best oral presentation at the XXVI World Congress of the International Union of Angiology 10th – 14th August 2014 in Sydney, Australia with entry number #820. The certificate was given to Mr Christopher Lattimer MBBS, FRCS, MS, PhD from Professor John Fletcher, Chairman of congress and President elect of the IUA, on behalf of the team and collaborators.

The award was for recognising that D-dimer levels taken from the leg in patients with chronic venous insufficiency were increased in comparison to their arm blood samples. The research arose from the hypothesis that local blood samples would be a better reflexion of local pathology than a systemic sample from the arm which has been altered through several organs and capillary beds. This led to the development of the ankle cubital D-dimer ratio (ACDR) which may be a more specific test at detecting pro-thrombotic states in the leg, like venous disease or a deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The advantage of the ACDR over a single arm sample is that it is not dependent on the age of the patient and it is unrelated to the type of measuring assay. Future studies are underway to determine whether this test may improve the specificity of D-dimer as a screening test in the detection of DVT.

The prize was awarded to our team which includes our overseas collaborators, Professor Jawed Fareed, Professor Debra Hoppensteadt and Daneyal Syed from the Department of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Loyola University, Chicago, USA. The rest of our team from the Josef Pflug vascular laboratory (http://josefpflugvascular.com) at Ealing hospital and Imperial College includes Dr Evi Kalodiki, Senior Research Fellow, and the head of our Department, Mr George Geroulakos.

Call for workshop ideas for the Faculty Teaching Forum

Dear all,

You are probably aware that the faculty teaching forum will be held this year on Thursday 27 November  12.45–5pm in the Glenister Lecture Theatre on the Charing Cross campus.

It is open to all staff who teach at Imperial and as ever promises to be a stimulating afternoon where we can learn together and enhance our knowledge of education. There is a theme of resilience and compassion and there will be an afternoon of talks and workshops together with a panel debate on “How do we promote resilience in our students?”

We are keen to make it relevant to you, our teachers and have some ideas from the feedback received last year.
However we would like to give you the chance to contribute to the event by running a workshop for your colleagues on any topic – not necessarily related to the theme. Current workshops include, “how to improve your lecturing skills” and “teaching on the run: how to teach in a busy clinic” as well as mindfulness  and a workshop on resilience vs compassion in our students.
The workshop would be a one hour session from 3.30 to 4.30 for a mixed group of approximately ten participants (clinicians, academics and support staff) and should be designed to be interactive.

Please contact either Professor Karim Meeran k.meeran@imperial.ac.uk, Dr Jo Harris joanne.harris@imperial.ac.uk, Dr Sonia Kumar Sonia.kumar@imperial.ac.uk or Dr Graham Easton g.easton@imperial.ac.uk  with any ideas you have for a workshop and feel free to discuss them with us if they are still at an early stage.

Due to lack of space we will not unfortunately be able to use all your ideas but possibly we can feed them forward to other events.