Series: Case studies

Our ‘case studies’ series showcases examples of participatory approaches to healthcare and biomedical research. These are often activities funded by our PPI Grant Scheme. The case studies explore what works well (and what hasn’t!) to give you ideas, inspiration and practical tips.

Case study #11: The ALGeBRA Steering Group for breast cancer research

This entry is part 11 of 15 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Camarie Welgemoed, Honorary Clinical Research Fellow and part-time PhD, currently working as Breast Specialist Superintendent in radiotherapy.

Working within: Radiotherapy at Charing Cross hospital, doing a PhD in the Department of Surgery and Cancer.

Case Study #12: Using a community organizing approach to develop a Quality Strategy

This entry is part 12 of 15 in the series Case studies

The Imperial NHS Quality Improvement team used a “community organizing approach” to run a Listening Campaign, Dec – Apr 2018. This helped them to develop their 2018-2023 Quality Strategy. Phoebe Rutherford explains how they went about it. You can hear more about their approach at their upcoming inaugural Share and Spread Improvement event.

What did you do?

We used a community organizing approach to lead a listening campaign in North West London to help shape our new Quality Strategy for 2018 – 2023. Between December and April 2018, we had around 1,000 conversations with staff, patients and community groups.

CASE STUDY #14: Public involvement in research that is less “public facing” – PPI and Mathematical Modelling

This entry is part 14 of 15 in the series Case studies

By Dale Weston, Research Fellow, NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (Modelling Methodology) (HPRU(MM))

What did you do?

Our project was a Patient and Public Involvement group with 8 members of the public, attending a half-day workshop. First, they provided input on a systematic literature review drafted by a member of the research team entitled “Human Behaviour and Infectious Disease Modelling: A Scoping Review of the Literature and Recommendations for the Future”. The members of the public were sent the draft systematic review to read ahead of the workshop together with a useful guide to reading a scientific paper.

Achieving more through public involvement in antimicrobial stewardship

This entry is part 15 of 15 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Dr Monsey McLeod, Lead Pharmacist Medication Safety and Anti-infectives Research and Dr Anne Campbell, Research Associate at National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Healthcare Associated Infection and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London.

What did you do?

Antimicrobial resistance is a key threat to patient safety and a major driver is antibiotic use. In the UK, general practitioners (GPs) prescribe approximately 75% of all antibiotics. Under 20% of these prescriptions will benefit patients, but they all increase the number of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, and can cause side-effects.