The Light At The End Of The Tunnel

Hi everyone!

I am finished with exams!!! Well, for this year, at least. After 8 weeks of close to constant revision, I am happy to say that I think that my efforts were worthwhile, and I gave it my best. All that awaits me now is a long summer, and a hopefully fruitful results day.

Anyway, now it is time to have some fun! In a couple of weeks, we have a workshop induction, where we learn how to use the super cool (and kind of scary) equipment in the mechanical engineering workshops. The practical part of my course is probably one of my favourite parts, because at the end of the day, mechanical engineering is using science and maths to solve practical problems; it just gives the course a bit of perspective. Also the boiler suits are great to wear. Seriously, they are like Onesies.

In the meantime, I intend to explore London, catch up on some sleep, and begin to relax.

 

6 comments for “The Light At The End Of The Tunnel

  1. Abubakr Olorunlambe says:

    How rigorous is your course and what revision techniques did you utilise during your “8 weeks of constant revision” :)?

    1. Harry Mitchell says:

      I would say that my course is firm but fair; The work is quite a lot, but not so much that there are not enough hours in the day to get it done and be able to do other things as well.
      My revision tactics are simple: read, memorise, apply. An average day would consist of reading a course module in the morning from 9-12AM, then answer tutorial sheet questions and past exam questions in the afternoon until I felt happy with what I had done. Any areas I found tricky I placed a greater weight in revising the next time it came around. I may have been a bit hyperbolic when using the word “constant”, but it was certainly thorough!
      I hope that helps!

  2. Ani Vasu says:

    Hi Harry,
    I am curious, what kind of maths did you learn in your first and second years?

    Also, as I am a prospective Imperial undergraduate mechanical engineer, currently studying in the US, I was wondering how many US undergraduate students you see around (particularly in engineering modules)? From my knowledge, there aren’t too many US undergraduates at Imperial.

    Thanks!

  3. Ani Vasu says:

    Hi Harry,
    I am curious, what kind of maths do you learn in your first and second years of mechanical engineering?
    Also, as I am a prospective Imperial undergraduate mechanical engineer, currently studying in the US, I was wondering how many US students you see at imperial (particularly in the mechanical engineering department)? From what I understand, there aren’t too many.

    Thanks!

  4. Hashmat Bakshi says:

    Absolutely amazing to read your stories and experiences at Imperial! Gives those of us who aim to study there and idea of how it is actually like!
    If I may ask, what were your predicted grades and final grades when being admitted to Imperial?
    Keep it up mate and would love to get in touch!
    Cheers!

    1. Harry Mitchell says:

      Hi there!
      It’s good to hear that some people are enjoying the blog :).
      My predicted grades were A*AAA (Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chemistry). I managed to get A*A*A*A* as my final grades, and then a couple of B’s at AS-level in non-related subjects.

      Hope that helps!

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