Feeling Nostalgic Already

I know, I know, it’s been a while but I have just been swamped under a mountain of work this month. It seems like, the closer we get to the Easter Break, the assignments just multiply by ten. After submitting my lab report, Business project and finally completing the rig building assessment on Friday I can finally say: I’M DONE!!

It has been a gruelling month, but as every lecturer completed their final lecture of the course I started to feel nostalgic for some unknown reason. I mean, it’s not like the year is over yet, plus I am still going to the revision lectures after the break. I think it’s just the fact that this academic year is drawing to an end and I have to say it has been one of the most challenging, liberating, mind opening, fun experiences of my life this far. I don’t know what I am going to do by the time we get to the fourth year and it really is all over-assuming that I’ll make it to that stage of course!

I don’t want to go on about my nostalgia, it’s not particularly interesting. I wanted to write a little summary of the things that have been going on this month at the college and around England in general. Please be patient; it’s a long list. So, without further ado, let’s get started.

Malaysian Night

This is perhaps one of the most anticipated events of the year. The Malaysian Society puts on an extraordinary show, which includes a play, dances (both western and traditional) and singing. The performers are mostly, if not all, freshers while the seniors do most of the backstage work like choreographing, producing, writing the script etc. To give you an idea of the magnitude of this event, the performers started working on the project way back in October.

Despite technical difficulties that led to cancelling the Saturday show, they brought their A game on Sunday’s show. All their hard work really paid off; it was absolutely amazing to watch the traditional dances and grain a greater insight to their culture.

(This time I didn’t bother with photos seeing as how badly the previous ones turned out so if you want to see any go on to https://www.facebook.com/icumalaysiansociety/photos_stream?ref=page_internal)

Solar Eclipse

The media had been going on and on about one of the biggest solar eclipses (more than 90% sun coverage) in quite a while, building a sense of overwhelming anticipation by the time Friday, 20th March, arrived everybody was expecting to witness a spectacular phenomenon. And this being Imperial, it meant that lecturers were just as eager, if not more, than the students and so we stopped half way through the lecture so we could watch the eclipse.

Queen’s Lawn was packed; some students managed to get up on Queen’s tower with their laptops to better record the event. But the day ended in great disappointment; the sun was nowhere to be found! There was a sea of cloud rendering the sun completely invisible. We couldn’t even locate the sun, let alone see the moon covering it. With dampened spirits, we returned to lectures. So much for an almost total solar eclipse.

Eclipse enthusiasts were let down.
Eclipse enthusiasts were let down.

Trip to Stonehenge and Bath

After seeing a post by a fellow blogger about a trip to Bath, I decided that I should also discover another part of England other than London. Though it was tough to wake up in the small hours of the morning (6:20 am to be exact; I haven’t woken up that early in almost a year now) and also ensuring my notoriously lazy friend to be ready by 8 am so that we catch the coach. But it was all worth it. I can understand why the Stonehenge is considered one of the wonders of the world; the sheer size of those rocks is tremendous and how they were erected is perhaps a mystery that can never be proven (archaeologists couldn’t find any tracks that the rocks could have been slid along on or any other method which would explain how these rocks ended up where they are). It would have been great if we could touch the rocks but the immediate vicinity was deemed too fragile for many tourists to stand on all at once. The rocks did look weather beaten and it appeared that a bit of vegetation managed to spring through the holes. In spite of that, these rocks have withstood the test of time and still manage to bewilder us.

This doesn't really need a caption!
This doesn’t need a caption!
A strange rock at the exhibition that resembles a baby.
A strange rock at the exhibition that resembles a baby.

We were allowed to enter the tiny huts where, presumable, the builders of the Stonehenge lived. They were no bigger than a standard room, circular and with no windows. In my opinion, a pretty poor compensation for all that arduous work they have put in. However, the weather was anything but ideal; it was cold, raining and extremely windy that people couldn’t even hold on to their umbrellas. So, I suggest that you make this trip in May, when the weather would have, hopefully, gotten warmer.

The builders' huts.
The builders’ huts.
What the builders called home.
What the builders called home.

In Bath we visited all of the tourist-y places like the Roman Baths (the water was actually warm! On a side note: is that why Bath is called Bath?), Bath Abbey (the walls and even the floor were adorned with ceramic tablets of people who contributed in one way or another to the society since the seventeenth century) and the Royal Crescent. The city had a more intimate atmosphere than in London, more like Reading where people are more likely to run into friends on the street. All of the buildings that I saw were at least 100 years old, so seeing ‘Banana Republic’ etched on a wall was, admittedly, quite bizarre. It is an amazing city with so much history and a LOT of Thai restaurants (I guess Bath-ians love their Thai food!!).

The Roman Baths.
The Roman Baths.
The Roman coins that were found at the site.
The Roman coins that were found at the site.
The beautiful stained glass window of Bath Abbey.
The beautiful stained glass window of Bath Abbey.

It was nice to get away from the buzz of London and discovering a new place though pretty exhausting-I slept till 1pm the following day.

Easter Break

With a month off, two distinct categories of people emerge: those who enjoy their holiday, going on road trips or sunny coasts around the world, out an about every day and those who hibernate for a month and pull out all-nighters every night, who emerge out of their cocoons blinking confusedly at the sun.

I would like to think that I fall in the middle of these two categories, perhaps leaning more towards the latter. Well, only time can tell.

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