Category: Case studies

Achieving more through public involvement in antimicrobial stewardship

This entry is part 15 of 15 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Dr Monsey McLeod, Lead Pharmacist Medication Safety and Anti-infectives Research and Dr Anne Campbell, Research Associate at National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit (NIHR HPRU) in Healthcare Associated Infection and Antimicrobial Resistance at Imperial College London.

What did you do?

Antimicrobial resistance is a key threat to patient safety and a major driver is antibiotic use. In the UK, general practitioners (GPs) prescribe approximately 75% of all antibiotics. Under 20% of these prescriptions will benefit patients, but they all increase the number of microbes that are resistant to antibiotics, and can cause side-effects. 

ITP – Immune Thrombocytopenia or Involve The Patient!

Dr Alice Hart, Clinical Research Fellow, Immune Haematology, Centre for Haematology

Twenty-eight people attended our patient involvement event sponsored by the Imperial Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) PPI grant scheme at the Hilton hotel. This included eight patients (aged 2-16) with Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP), their parents/siblings and members of the non-malignant haematology research group – doctors, scientists, clinical nurses, research nurses and a research coordinator.

We started with a science entertainer doing fun experiments, like making dry ice bubbles, with the children to set the ball rolling. The children really enjoyed it – two told us they want to be scientists when they grow up!

Frontiers in Cystinuria Research – Learning from patient experience to inform precision medicine research

Dr Toby Athersuch, Lecturer, Phenome Centre

‘Frontiers in Cystinuria Research’ was an event held last October at Imperial College London. It involved people affected by cystinuria in discussions with expert medical professionals and academic researchers active in this area. The aim of the event was to capture some of these rich patient experiences to inform future precision medicine research, while simultaneously providing a forum for patients to share their insight. We feel that these types of event are important enablers of patient-directed research development, particularly relevant in the context of rare metabolic diseases, where patient input and advocacy is often underrepresented.

Case Study #15: ‘MatImms’ involve women in research addressing low maternal vaccination uptake

By Dr Helen Skirrow, Speciality Registrar, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London Public Health Medicine Specialist Training Program; Honorary Clinical Research Fellow, School of Public Health, Imperial College London; MatImms Research Team, International Centre Child Health, Paediatrics, School of Medicine.

Our multi-disciplinary research team of midwives, doctors and scientists investigates vaccination in pregnancy (the MatImms project) and is led by Professor Beate Kampmann. MatImms encourages vaccination in pregnancy to protect newborn babies from preventable infections. In the laboratory, MatImms studies the impact of vaccines on immunity in mothers and babies. In order to connect with pregnant women, we developed the MatImms Smartphone App to improve vaccine information available, enabling pregnant women and their support networks to make informed choices.

CASE STUDY #14: Public involvement in research that is less “public facing” – PPI and Mathematical Modelling

This entry is part 14 of 15 in the series Case studies

By Dale Weston, Research Fellow, NIHR Health Protection Research Unit (Modelling Methodology) (HPRU(MM))

What did you do?

Our project was a Patient and Public Involvement group with 8 members of the public, attending a half-day workshop. First, they provided input on a systematic literature review drafted by a member of the research team entitled “Human Behaviour and Infectious Disease Modelling: A Scoping Review of the Literature and Recommendations for the Future”. The members of the public were sent the draft systematic review to read ahead of the workshop together with a useful guide to reading a scientific paper.

Case Study #12: Using a community organizing approach to develop a Quality Strategy

This entry is part 12 of 15 in the series Case studies

The Imperial NHS Quality Improvement team used a “community organizing approach” to run a Listening Campaign, Dec – Apr 2018. This helped them to develop their 2018-2023 Quality Strategy. Phoebe Rutherford explains how they went about it. You can hear more about their approach at their upcoming inaugural Share and Spread Improvement event.

What did you do?

We used a community organizing approach to lead a listening campaign in North West London to help shape our new Quality Strategy for 2018 – 2023. Between December and April 2018, we had around 1,000 conversations with staff, patients and community groups.

Case study #11: The ALGeBRA Steering Group for breast cancer research

This entry is part 11 of 15 in the series Case studies

In conversation with: Camarie Welgemoed, Honorary Clinical Research Fellow and part-time PhD, currently working as Breast Specialist Superintendent in radiotherapy.

Working within: Radiotherapy at Charing Cross hospital, doing a PhD in the Department of Surgery and Cancer.

Case Study #10: An interactive PPIE workshop on kidney transplant rejection

This entry is part 10 of 15 in the series Case studies

We are delighted to announce the NIHR Imperial BRC PPI Grant Scheme is now open until Friday 19 October 2018, 5pm. The purpose of this grant scheme is to support motivated researchers and their teams to undertake meaningful and impactful public and patient involvement that will shape their research and enhance the translation of biomedical research from bench to bedside. As this is our fourth round of funding, we spoke with Dr Candice Roufosse, Senior Clinical Lecturer at the Centre for Inflammatory Diseases about how winning a PPI Grant helped improve their research.