Could gut hormones help make Dry January last all year?

After the excesses of Christmas and New Year, it has become fashionable for January to be promoted as a time for reassessment and resolutions. There are promises and attempts at living a healthier lifestyle, including stopping drinking alcohol (‘Dry January’), joining that gym, stopping smoking, and eating better. However, we know how difficult it is to maintain behaviour change over the longer term. People start drinking excessively again, put back on the weight they lose, start smoking again, and their attendance at the gym wanes. For people who have hazardous levels of drinking, and those who are dependent on alcohol, this is particularly problematic.

If people manage to stop drinking alcohol, we know that there are high relapse rates. In some studies, 60% of people with alcohol dependence have started drinking alcohol again after 6 months of abstinence. This is often precipitated by exposure to social events and situations where there is drinking, and stresses with family, job, and social circumstances. What is needed are strategies to help prevent relapse into drinking. While psychological and group support can be of benefit, there is also a potential role for medications to help reduce the craving for alcohol and the response to stress.

The Division of Brain Sciences in the Department of Medicine at Imperial College London are currently running a research study in this area. We are investigating the potential benefit of a completely novel therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse in alcohol dependence. This is the ‘Gut Hormone in Addiction’ (GHADD) Study, funded by the Medical Research Council. This is targeting hormones from our guts, which can act on our brain to influence eating and addictive behaviours. (more…)

Festive feasting: the good, the bad and the microbiome

As the festive season approaches, one wonders how our bodies prepare for the enormity of food that will be ingested in a relatively short space of time.  In the UK alone, the average person consumes 7000 calories on Christmas Day alone.  This is three times the recommended calorie intake per day, and most of us will have reached the recommended calorie intake before Christmas lunch has even been served. And of course, it’s not just about eating more. We are also a great deal more sedentary, with the average person in the UK spending 5.5 hours a day in front of the television over the Christmas period desperately awaiting reruns of Blackadder and yet another Christmas special!

Of course, this massive increase in consumption over the festive period inevitably means we put on weight, with research showing maximum weight gain reached within 10 days of Christmas Day, peaking around 3 January, and then falling.  However, despite this relatively rapid increase in weight in the space of a few days, approximately half of the weight gained seems to remain until the summer months or beyond.  The cumulative effects of this annual increase in weight during the holiday period likely contribute to one’s overall lifetime weight gain.

Obesity results from a mismatch between food intake and energy expenditure.  So is this festive weight gain a result of eating too much and spending too much time on the sofa?  What if it was more than just that? We now know that the gut is a crucial organ in the maintenance of energy homeostasis.  It releases a whole host of hormones such as glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY that regulate appetite in response to nutrient intake.  Much of my work has focused on looking at the effect of dietary protein on appetite.  High protein diets reduce food intake and improve body composition, and if people can stick to them, they lose weight.  (more…)