Author: Geoff Day

www.imperial.ac.uk/people/g.day

Accessibility tricks and treats

Three lit halloween pumpkins and candles next to a laptop showing the Imperial accessibility website
As you may be aware there were some new digital accessibility regulations that came into force last year called the Public Sector Bodies (Websites and Mobile Applications) (No. 2) Accessibility Regulations 2018. These regulations mean that all public sector bodies (including universities) must ensure websites and mobile applications are more accessible.

There is a project being undertaken to ensure the College fulfils its obligations and to identify those websites and applications that don’t meet the College’s standards.

So what are our standards?

At the College we aim to meet WCAG 2.1 standards (level AA). Most of these standards are to do with the way that the content is structured and delivered in terms of the underlying code in the templates and content types. If you are using the College’s centrally supported websites (such as T4), then most of these things are out of your control as an editor. But, there are some things that are in your control such as how you add images, links and other content to your pages.

With Halloween fast-approaching I thought I would ease any fears and share some tricks and treats to show you how easy it is to improve your content.

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Interpreting your Google Analytics data

Dog behind a laptop showing Google Analytics

Google Analytics is a very powerful tool which tracks how people interact with the pages they visit, this includes:

  • which pages they go to
  • how long they spend on them
  • where they came from i.e. did they use a search, type a web address in directly, click on a link in a newsletter etc.
  • what type of device they used
  • where in the world they were

and much much more.

Google Analytics records hundreds and hundreds of types of information that you can combine to build a picture of how people use our websites. Having access to all this data can be overwhelming and most of you won’t have the time (or patience) to trawl through it all.  We just need a few pieces of information to help us understand how our site is performing.

In this post I’ll explain some of main metrics to look out for and how you should interpret these to inform your content decisions. (more…)

Enduring excellence in research goes digital

A few months ago the Research Office approached us to help them turn their publication, Enduring excellence in research, into a set of web pages. I thought it might be interesting to use this example to explore some of the challenges of presenting a printed document online and the approach we took.

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Happy blogday!

Cake with "Happy Birthday" and the number 1 on it.

 

Wow, has it been a year already? The content design blog is celebrating its first birthday.

In this post I thought I would share some of the highlights of the year with a list of the most read posts:

  1. Tools for card sorting and tree testing – 12 February 2018
  2. Content design techniques: content audits – 1 February 2018
  3. Content design techniques: User and job stories – 17 May 2018
  4. Content design techniques: pair writing – 15 June 2018
  5. Content design techniques: card sorting – 19 March 2018
  6. Techniques: Content discovery and audience mapping – 2 October 2018
  7. Tools for collaborative writing – 19 July 2018

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